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Sciences

Sciences

This project is a Nucleo Mileno creditor fund, that seeks to promote the development of extrasolar planets research using technology manufactured in Chile, the will be carried out by experts in astronomy at the University of Valparaíso (UV) and experimental physics researchers from the Scientific and Technological Center of Valparaíso (CCTVal) of the Santa María University (USM).

This project is a  Nucleo Mileno creditor fund, that seeks to promote the development of extrasolar planets research using technology manufactured in Chile, the will be carried out by experts in astronomy at the University of Valparaíso (UV) and experimental physics researchers from the Scientific and Technological Center of Valparaíso (CCTVal) of the Santa María University (USM).

The proposal worthy of a Núcleo Milenio fund will be led by a group of the Institute of Physics and Astronomy of the University of Valparaíso, formed by Dr. Amelia Bayo as Director, Dr. Matthias Schreiber as Subrogation Director and Dr. Johan Olofsson, leader of the Tandem Group of Astronomy Max Planck-UV, in collaboration with a group of experts of Experimental Physics of the CCTVal of the Santa Maria University, conformed by the doctors Hayk Hakobyan, William Brooks, Christian Romero and Claudio Dib.

With the aim of advancing in the field of astronomical exploration, specifically in the investigation of the phenomenon of formation of extrasolar planets, the proposal called Millennium Nucleus of Formation of Planets, proposes the elaboration of a new generation of telescopes that use astronomical mirrors made on the basis of carbon fiber, which allow progress in the construction of optical resolution mirrors that can be used for astronomical observation.

GlueX is an experiment which takes place in Jefferson Lab's D Hall, located in the United States. The experiment´s objective is to obtain important data to achieve one of Physics most fundamental challenges: the quantitative understanding of the quark and gluon confinement in the Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The confinement is a unique characteristic to QCD and to understand it, a comprehension of soft gluon field is required, which is responsible of linking quarks and hadrons.

 

GlueX is an experiment which takes place in Jefferson Lab's D Hall, located in the United States. The experiment´s objective is to obtain important data to achieve one of Physics most fundamental challenges: the quantitative understanding of the quark and gluon confinement in the Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The confinement is a unique characteristic to QCD and to understand it, a comprehension of soft gluon field is required, which is responsible of linking quarks and hadrons.

Main Injector Experiment for v-A o MINVERvA, is an experiment of neutrino dispersion that uses the NuMI beam from the Fermilab Laboratory. MINERvA tries to measure the low energy of neutrino interaction as support in neutrino oscillation experiments as well as in the study of the strong dynamic of nucleons and nucleus that affect these interactions. This is done using the full range of nuclear targets from helium to carbon up to lead, and a scintillator plotter finely segmented to rebuild the event´s dynamics.

 

Main Injector Experiment for v-A o MINVERvA, is an experiment of neutrino dispersion that uses the NuMI beam from the Fermilab Laboratory. MINERvA tries to measure the low energy of neutrino interaction as support in neutrino oscillation experiments as well as in the study of the strong dynamic of nucleons and nucleus that affect these interactions. This is done using the full range of nuclear targets from helium to carbon up to lead, and a scintillator plotter finely segmented to rebuild the event´s dynamics.

Is a leading-edge, international experiment for neutrino science and proton decay studies. Discoveries over the past half-century have put neutrinos, the most abundant matter particles in the universe, in the spotlight for further research into several fundamental questions about the nature of matter and the evolution of the universe — questions that DUNE will seek to answer.

Is a leading-edge, international experiment for neutrino science and proton decay studies. Discoveries over the past half-century have put neutrinos, the most abundant matter particles in the universe, in the spotlight for further research into several fundamental questions about the nature of matter and the evolution of the universe — questions that DUNE will seek to answer.

A double-target system is planned to build and to install in the experimental Hall B and D in the Jefferson lab for precision measurements of nuclear medium effects in electron scattering with 10–11 GeV electron beams. This system will allow a precise comparison of elementary targets such as deuterium and hydrogen to heavy solid targets (carbon, iron, aluminum, tin, lead, uranium, etc.) to study subtle medium effects such as hadronization in nuclear medium, color transparency, and nuclear short range correlations. During the data acquisition one cryo-target and one solid target will be exposed to the beam simultaneously.

Due to its high penetration capacity, when placing sensible detectors above and below an object of interest, it is possible to monitor a muon, as it will go through each of the detectors. Considering this, if a line is traced across a minimum of two points, the path of incoming and outgoing muons could be identified. It is known that the crossing of muons through heavy materials, cause deviations in their path, thus, if a deviation can be observed at a certain point, this would mean that the existence of a dense material is probable. On the other hand, if there is no deviation, we can then conclude that the muon would have gone through air, and this would therefore be an underground fissure.

Due to its high penetration capacity, when placing sensible detectors above and below an object of interest, it is possible to monitor a muon, as it will go through each of the detectors. Considering this, if a line is traced across a minimum of two points, the path of incoming and outgoing muons could be identified.

It is known that the crossing of muons through heavy materials, cause deviations in their path, thus, if a deviation can be observed at a certain point, this would mean that the existence of a dense material is probable. On the other hand, if there is no deviation, we can then conclude that the muon would have gone through air, and this would therefore be an underground fissure. 

On the outset, this project consists on the design and construction of a calorimeter called Pre-shower, sensitive to the position where a particle passes through and to the energy deposited by this one in any of the scintillator crystals of its square arrangement.

On the outset, this project consists on the design and construction of a calorimeter called Pre-shower, sensitive to the position where a particle passes through and to the energy deposited by this one in any of the scintillator crystals of its square arrangement.

ATLAS is an experiment of major importance located in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a tunnel in the shape of a ring, 27 kilometers in diameter where particles travel at a great speed, colliding against each other.

ATLAS is an experiment of major importance located in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a tunnel in the shape of a ring, 27 kilometers in diameter where particles travel at a great speed, colliding against each other.

The construction of the Aguas Negras tunnel that will link Chile and Argentina is a great opportunity to have, for the very first time, an underground scientific laboratory of great depth in South America, where state of the art science will be carried out. Agua Negra Deep Experiment Site, A.N.D.E.S signifies a scientific integration among Latin American nations. The idea is to stablish an underground laboratory that will attract scientists from all over the world to develop first line experiments and to stablish experimental collaborations in South America.

The construction of the Aguas Negras tunnel that will link Chile and Argentina is a great opportunity to have, for the very first time, an underground scientific laboratory of great depth in South America, where state of the art science will be carried out. Agua Negra Deep Experiment Site, A.N.D.E.S signifies a scientific integration among Latin American nations. The idea is to stablish an underground laboratory that will attract scientists from all over the world to develop first line experiments and to stablish experimental collaborations in South America.

After successfully working in experimental projects related to the area of Particle Physics, data analysis, parts manufacturing and software development, CCTVal and Jefferson Lab (JLab) were awarded a grant fund from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, better known as NASA, with the objective of implementing a Fusion System of scientific information for satellite measurements on Earth for which a software of high scalability must be developed, capable of processing massive amounts of satellite data.

After successfully working in experimental projects related to the area of Particle Physics, data analysis, parts manufacturing and software development, CCTVal and Jefferson Lab (JLab) were awarded a grant fund from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, better known as NASA, with the objective of implementing a Fusion System of scientific information for satellite measurements on Earth for which a software of high scalability must be developed, capable of processing massive amounts of satellite data.

This project will be carried out by two IT civil engineers from Santa Maria University, Sebastian Mancilla and Ricardo Oyarzún, together with two CCTVal members, William Brooks and Hayk Hakobyan.

The team will work with nine years of data relating to climate and weather from all over the world stored by NASA which must be analyzed in the most assertive way possible.

In addition to CCTVAl´s team, the project counts with the participation of researchers from JLab and NASA.

The Mirror Project seeks to master the fabrication techniques for making lightweight mirrors with a backing material of carbon-fiber–reinforced polymer (CRFP) used in large scale particle detectors such as the Ring-Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector. The objetive is to develop manufacturing capacity for the production of lightweight mirrors, used in Particle Physics and astrophysics research. These mirrors are a component of particle detectors capable of detecting subatomic particles with positive or negative charge passing through a transparent medium, and which can be used in High Energy Physics research, nuclear physics experiments, and Astrophysics studies.

The Mirror Project seeks to master the fabrication techniques for making lightweight mirrors with a backing material of carbon-fiber–reinforced polymer (CRFP) used in large scale particle detectors such as the Ring-Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector.

The objetive is to develop manufacturing capacity for the production of lightweight mirrors, used in Particle Physics and astrophysics research. These mirrors are a component of particle detectors capable of detecting subatomic particles with positive or negative charge passing through a transparent medium, and which can be used in High Energy Physics research, nuclear physics experiments, and Astrophysics studies.

In the first stage of the project, a prototype will be manufactured with the appropriate smoothness, dimensional accuracy, and reflectivity features. In order to fabricate the mirrors it is necessary to   construct a layup form or “mandrel” to shape each of the mirror parts, a physical vapor deposition (PVD) chamber to deposit a reflective layer and a protective layer of materials such as aluminum and silicon oxide, and a polishing station needed to achieve an optical-quality surface on the mandrel.